Social implications of AI

The next and last meeting for this semester will take place on the 30.6. at 18:00 at the Tunnel Vienna.
Since we probably don’t see each other till October, we figured it would be nice to have a “home exercise” for the summer (like last year). Therefore I’d like to ask you for suggestions. If there is any literature you think is interesting, let us know. On the next meeting we will then choose together which one we want to read over the summer. Besides that we also will send out a collection of all suggestions.

For our this times meeting Nino prepared the topic Social implications of AI. Please have a look at the literature provided:

1)
Kurzgesagt Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSKi8HfcxEk
CGP-Grey Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Pq-S557XQU
2)
Wait-But-Why Blog Part 1&2:
http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-1.html
http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/01/artificial-intelligence-revolution-2.html
3)
Paper on AI-Safety:
https://arxiv.org/abs/1606.06565
“The focus of the discussion should not be if and how a general AI is technological feasible but on the social implications of automation and the rapid improvement of AI’s”

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P vs. NP Problem

At our next meeting on 28th November we will discuss the P vs. NP problem of complexity theory presented by Thomas Zauner. There are several levels of readings.

Level 1
Watch this video explaining the basics about the P vs. NP problem and complexity theory.

Level 2a
Read this article explaining not only the concepts, but also shedding some light on recent developments in research.
http://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2009/9/38904-the-status-of-the-p-versus-np-problem/fulltext

Level 2b
Watch these excellent and well explained lecture video on an introduction complexity. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moPtwq_cVH8
(For further studies see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHZifpgyH_4)

Level 3
For further reading consult the always-insightful Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy.
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/computational-complexity/